Whats right is right/wrong is wrong

Whats right is right/wrong is wrong

The unfortunate part is when law enforcement allows their ego to play a role in their jobs no one wins. Detective Beasley used his influence, position, and power to put all the pieces on the board in his favor. The deck was stacked against my mother and my brother, and as long as opportunity presents itself I will expose Detective Beasley for all his actions to distract from the truth and derail justice for Keith and accountability for my mother.

 

Below is another example of how law enforcement will allow ego to replace truth and justice………

 

http://www.cleveland.com/brett/blog/index.ssf/2008/08/how_barberton_police_wrongly_a.html

 

 

Everyone missed the Mann next door.

Barberton police never considered Earl Mann a suspect.

Mann lived a mere two houses down from the murder scene. He murdered and raped Judy Johnson, then raped and beat her granddaughter. Mann pleaded guilty Monday.

Clarence Elkins served 71/2 years for the brutal 1998 attack.

How could so many people have been so wrong? How does a wrongful conviction happen? Barberton police previously declined to comment, but based on interviews and documents, here’s the formula they used:

Rely on a single eyewitness:

Police trusted the statements of a traumatized 6-year-old who lost consciousness after being choked. The granddaughter gave conflicting accounts of what she saw briefly in the dark.

She saw a knife; she saw no weapon. She heard arguing; she heard nothing. She saw the attacker’s face; she didn’t see him.

Ignore what doesn’t fit:

When Barberton police stopped Mann four months after the murder on another charge, Mann told the officer, “Why don’t you just charge me for the murder of Judy Johnson?” The officer jotted the comment on a note and gave it to a supervisor. No one investigated it.

Mishandle the evidence:

Hours after the murder, a police officer asked an unknown male at the granddaughter’s home to go upstairs and retrieve the nightgown she wore when raped. The cop never even got the man’s name.

The jar that contained oil that was probably used in the rapes was dropped and broken by a police officer at the scene.

No one checked for the key in the mailbox, even after police learned Judy kept one there. It could have held clues as to why there was no forced entry.

Don’t record key interviews:

Police officers did not record interviews with the granddaughter or Clarence. Barberton videotapes DUI cases but didn’t tape this capital murder case.

But the biggest mistake of all was missing the connection to Mann’s wife, Tonia Brasiel, who lived two houses from Judy.

The granddaughter showed up at Brasiel’s door covered in blood, face bruised, choke marks on her neck, crying that her grandma was dead.

Not one officer questioned why Brasiel never called an ambulance, why she didn’t invite the girl in for her safety, why she woke her three sleeping daughters, ages 6, 7 and 8, instead of calling police about a murderer on the loose.

Had police checked, they would have discovered Brasiel was still on probation for child endangering. Most likely, they would have found Mann in her home washing away evidence.

The first time a police officer interviewed the granddaughter, Brasiel was present. It was Brasiel who gave the officer Clarence’s full name.

The first person to talk to the granddaughter about the murder was Brasiel, not a police officer.

A year after Clarence was convicted, Barberton police learned that three girls were raped by their father, Earl Mann. A lubricant was used, just as with the granddaughter and Judy.

Too bad the police missed so much. They could have spared Clarence Elkins years of prison and those three little girls something much worse.

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